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Tikoy Aguiluz’s art of waves, whorls and wings

August 31, 2019

Posting late but as they say, better late than never….

“A fortnight after joining a group show at Sining Kamalig, Tikoy Aguiluz had his first one-man show at Kanto Gallery in Makati Central Square. Billed as “Rara Avis,” the exhibit opened on June 8, with Virginia R. Moreno cutting the ribbon with the assistance of Jun Factoran. Another guest of honor, Nestor Vinluan, came a little late for the opening rite.

Other artist-friends in attendance included Pandy Aviado, Heber Bartolome, Gus Albor, filmmaker Onin Delotavo Tagaro, who co-directed the Urian award-winning documentary, Yield, and filmmaker/producer Toshihiku Uriu, owner of the gallery and the Tiu Theater (with a screening room and a sound stage) also at Makati Central Square. Uriu is also the co-producer of Aguiluz’s film-in-progress, Pisonet.

Tikoy, a.k.a. Amable R. Aguiluz VI, who has won various awards for his notable documentaries and feature films, started with his recent spate of artworks in late 2017 when he took a three-month residency in Sri Lanka.

Rara Avis Xhibt

Film Director Tikoy Aguiluz, friend and UP Film Center colleague I have worked with for decades as his film editor, and I holding the drawing I have chosen from one of his sketchbooks. Ms. Virginia R. Moreno cut the ribbon to open the exhibit.

He says he made it a daily habit in the beginning of 2018, producing what were basically sketches for oil paintings, but that these developed a life of their own. For these sketches, he used a Bic ballpen and different kinds of Pentel pens, mostly black but sometimes blue.

To read Krip Yuson’s article full article: “Tikoy Aguiluz’s art of waves, whorls and wings”, please click the following link: https://www.philstar.com/lifestyle/arts-and-culture/2019/06/17/1926896/tikoy-aguiluzs-art-waves-whorls-and-wings

 

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Film on APO MABINI Showing July 28 at the Open Air Auditorium, Rizal Park

July 27, 2019

From July 17-23, the annual celebration of the National Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation Week is held in the Philippines as a tribute to Apolinario Mabini, one of our national heroes. He was paralyzed at the height of his career as a lawyer. Despite that, he became the Chief Adviser of the first Philippine president Emilio Aguinaldo. Mabini was our first Prime Minister, and the first Minister of Foreign Affairs. As part of the post-celebration of the NDPR Week, the National Parks Development Committee shall screen the one-hour educational documentary at the Open-Air Auditorium in Rizal Park tomorrow, July 28, 2019 at 7:30 pm. Admission is FREE!

!pule poster_for Jul 28

Note that Apolinario Mabini was elected officer of the LIGA FILIPINA founded by Jose Rizal, another great hero after whom the place where it shall be shown, Rizal Park was named after. Rizal was executed at the then Bagumbayan, now called Rizal Park on December 30, 1896. Mabini born on July 23, 1864 died on May 13, 1903.

 

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Gen. Charles E. Kilbourne Initiated the Building of Malinta Tunnel in Corregidor?

June 28, 2019
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General Charles E. Kilbourne

Oh well, that’s what I just read today from an article about Malinta Tunnel building on Corregidor Island — birthplace of my forefathers, father and siblings. It was Gen. Charles Kilbourne, then re-assigned to assume the Harbour Defense Command in 1929 who revived the idea of building the tunnel under the Malinta Hill in December 1931. He worked on its realization, initiated and finally got the approval of the building project on January 14, 1932. To lead the construction work, Lt. Paschal N. Strong of the US Army Corps of Engineers was sent over. He arrived in the Philippines in 1932.

So, the idea which got hatched in 1921 started to get realized only in 1932 not 1922 as stated on a sign displayed outside Malinta Tunnel. The use of prison labor from Bilibid prison was said to be also his idea leading to building of prison stockades. The photo of Dr. Selma Harrison Calmes’ father with the prisoners that she graciously allowed me to use in my documentary TIGA-ISLA (The Islanders of Corregidor) is included in the same article simply captioned “Bilibid stockade.”

To read all the details, here’s the link to the article of Mr. John Moffit written on December 12, 2012: http://corregidor.org/fieldnotes/htm/fots2-121224-1.htm

Incidentally, I found just a few days ago, a letter already eaten up by silver fishes written by Gen. Charles E. Kilbourne in reply to I do not know exactly who. Was it my father, or my historian brother who wrote to him? Since Juan Medina whom he mentioned in the letter were grandfather to both, I wouldn’t know until I find a copy of the welcome letter sent to the General that he was referring to. Anyway, what is clear was that he was on a visit here at the time the undated letter was written. Knowing that he died in 1963, I would assume that he was in the country sometime in the 50s for a sentimental journey.

Gen. Kilbourne sounded how well he knew my great granduncle Juan Medina, former municipal president (mayor) of Bo. San Jose, Corregidor. Lolo Juan and my father’s father Mateo were brothers. The latter was appointed as Corregidor municipal councilor in 1906.

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Letter of Gen. Charles Kilbourne in reply either to my father, Ricardo M. Medina Sr. or my historian-brother Isagani R. Medina, both Corregidorians

Kilbourne Letter_Back

kilbourneGen. Kilbourne “was responsible for much of the military development of the island fortress of Corregidor. During his third assignment there [Philippines], from 1908 to 1913, he established the first artillery garrison on Corregidor.” (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_E._Kilbourne)

We have two other letters written by Gen. Kilbourne, one dated 1936; the other written from Maryland that is undated. Both original copy of the letters were deposited in 2004 at the Pacific War Museum on Corregidor Island. In addition, the Certificate of Appointment of my grandfather Mateo dated 1906, and written in Spanish is also at the museum. Currrently, they are under the care of Corregidor Foundation, Inc.

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Lips to Lips: The Evolution of Kissing Scenes in Philippine Movies

June 22, 2019

“Every imaginable taboo, once unspoken and forbidden, has been depicted in graphic ways in Philippine movies,” says Alex Castro.

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From Alex Castro’s “Lips to Lips: The Evolution of Kissing Scenes in Philippine Movies”

In his lengthy, impressively researched and well- documented article — flavored with trivia notes at times — about the evolution of kissing scenes in Philippine movies, readers, particularly film history buffs journey with Mr. Castro from way way back, when yes! it was taboo for lovers to kiss, even hold hands in public; the reason why it was so shocking for the viewers to watch kissing scenes, especially when first shown in the movies. Now, it is so common a segment without it and lovemaking would render a film incomplete. It has become part of the formula.

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Vicente Salumbides and Sofia Lota in “Fate or Consequence” (1926) from Salumbides’ book “Motion Pictures in the Philippines” (1952)

Reading about Mr. Vicente Salumbides in the article, I couldn’t help but recall my interview with him. He did say how jealous her then-future wife was, Rosario Panganiban when his film, “Fate or Consequence” showing him kissing actress Sofia Lota was shown. Mr. Salumbides was hard of hearing at that time. To communicate with him, I had to write each question on a piece of paper and gave it to him one at a time. He would read it, then would reply to whatever question I handed to him. I was then working as a researcher for the UP Film Center, and about to start a documentary on him when unfortunately our house burned. The flames ate up all the materials that I gathered from my interviews with him, Alejandro Celis, one of his silent movie actors, and Atang de la Rama. At that time, Mr. Salumbides was living somewhere in Fairview, Quezon City, BF Homes, if I am not mistaken.

To read Alex Castro’s full article, please click the link below:
https://www.esquiremag.ph/culture/movies-and-tv/evolution-of-kissing-scenes-philippine-movies-a2289-20190612-lfrm5

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Deaf Visual Artist Rommel Agravante’s “MOTHER & CHILD”

May 31, 2019

Rommel Agravante, a Deaf visual artist was my Filipino Sign Language teacher at DLS-CSB School of Deaf Education and Applied Studies. He stopped teaching at SDEAS to study painting at the University of the Philippines. He got a Certificate in Painting from UP. Below is his interpretation of a Mother and Child whose idea I let him do freely.

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Rommel Agravante with his painting, “Mother and Child”, an oil painting on wooden panel; Size: 20″ x 24″

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My pet, Pitz looks at the painting of Rommel, my former Filipino Sign Language teacher.

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Kodi Lee: Blind singer with autism wows ‘America’s Got Talent’ judges, gets away with Golden Buzzer

May 29, 2019

Watch amazing Kodi Lee, a 22-year old blind singer with autism!

According to his mother Tina: “…Through music and performing, he was able to withstand living in this world, because when you’re autistic, it’s really hard to do what everybody else does. It actually saved his life playing music.”

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Romy Gutierrez’s Paintings that Caught Our Eyes

May 20, 2019
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Titled “A MOTHER’s EMBRACE,” (2013) this is very much off Romy Gutierrez’s cup. Seems an experiment of sort since he is known for using pastel color shades. This is one of the few works he had that stood out for being different, at least in the color choices used because the subject is still one of his favorite: Mother and Child. But much the same as the others, this particular work, had textures made out of overlapping paper until some form of relief shaped up.

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“SOFT, RADIANT GLOW” quite gripped my senses, having been an admirer of Juvenal Sanso’s paintings. This immediately reminded me of the man’s work.  Gutierrez did not deny that Sanso had an influence on him. Of course,  they were no more evident in the rest of his works after this phase I would assume. Made in 2009, or five years after the one above was made, he continuously experimented on techniques and style to at least probably deviate from his usual creations. Here he created another textural form which need not use the familiar textured lines or layered paper as base. I see here more of brush textures and spattered colors that on its own richly formed new dimensions..

“SEATED MODEL” (1992) – Probably, one of those phases in Romy Gutierrez’s life when he first let flowing white paint texture his canvas. There is something classic in the expression of the subject; at the same time the lines reminds me of Picasso’s

“GRATEFUL HEART” (2009) — Here the flowing and fluid lines, circular forms, luminous patches of colors that give layers of dimensions to an other wise plain, flat form continues. This has become the more known style of Gutierrez. As he loves textures, he creates each time something new. I just suppose that the underlying textures he creates at times leads him to something he himself may not have seen or thought of before, and proceed from there. This is creativity at work.

“CONVERSATION” (2014) – A beautifully composed and rendered lines and forms over the usual textured base, he departed for a while from the light hues, by adding purple shades and orange colors.

The works above were not included in the 39th Solo Exhibition of Romy Gutierrez held last month at the Impressions Gallery, SM Megamall.