Posts Tagged ‘Rowena Ulayan’

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Daily Prompt: Tongue_Cuneiform

February 11, 2014

Tongue is always equated with language –and language can be written, read and be visual like sign language. The early writing system known as cuneiform recorded the tongue of the past.  Cuneiform came from the Latin word cuneus “wedge” and forma “shape,” and came into English usage “probably from Old French cunéiforme” according to wikipedia. Cuneiform was adapted for the writing of Akkadian, Eblaite, Elamite, Hittite, Luwian, Hattic, Hurrian, Urartian and Old Persian languages up to 1st century AD from 31st c BC. Just don’t know how I’d fare had I live during those days!!! I am just amazed at how people speak several languages like my artist-friend Rowena Ulayan, now based in in Turkey. Fondly called Weng [see Feb 9 blogpost] she speaks eight languages. The Philippines’ national hero — our hero — Dr. Jose Rizal by the way spoke 22 languages! He was most fluent in Spanish, German, French, Latin and Hebrew.

CuneiformA few cuneiform writings nearly the size of an i-phone are displayed at the Museum of Anatolian Civilization [Anadolu Medeniyetleri Muzesi], the other museum I visited in Ankara, Turkey.

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http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/02/10/daily-post-take-that-rosetta/

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Daily Prompt: Perspective_Hagia Sophia

November 21, 2013

From a predominantly Catholic country in the East [Philippines] to a predominantly Muslim Country [Turkey], it was indeed a total change in perspective for me, well, geographically that is. Anyhow, I quite enjoyed every new sights that I have seen, and every little new sounds that I heard, especially the Turkish language of course. It was also a joy to meet new people, and to meet old friends. Below are some shots taken from the bus as we head for Tuzla District when I arrived in Turkey on October 29. Friend Rowena Ulayan, now a resident of the place fetched me from Ataturk International Airport.

Crossing the Bridge

Going from the European to the Asian Side of Turkey

Old the new

The old and new architectural design contrasts caught my attention.

But of all the changes that I have seen, the magnificent and gigantic mosques are what really  amazed me, particularly The Blue Mosque or Sultanahmet [click to see night shots of the mosque] and Hagia Sophia. The latter was special to me somehow because when I was in college, I wrote a term paper in my Humanities subject about it. Seeing it in reality was dream come true.

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Hagia Sophia

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Interior shot of Hagia Sophia

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Another shot of the dome. The building is currently under renovation.

I was still in Istanbul when Typhoon Yolanda [Haiyan] struck our country with a storm surge that devastated almost everything in its path and killed thousands [over 4,000 as of press time] which up to now are counting. The day before I left Turkey for home members of the Filipino community were at the peak of discussion re sending relief to our people. That goes true worldwide. The outpouring of help and sympathy came in all forms. Ambassador Irakli of Georgia whom Rowena and I met in the art exhibit of Edward Munch and Andy Warhol at Ankara, in his email said: “…Let me express my condolences with regards to the destruction of the Philippine city of Tacloban by the typhoon “Haiyan”, which took the lives of hundreds of peaceful citizens. I was at the Philippine’s Embassy and expressed the condolences on behalf of the people and government of Georgia. Let me wish you and your country all the best!!!” The destruction of Tacloban City itself has brought a lot of changes — physically as many villages were swept away, emotionally and psychologically  to the victims who survived, and to politicians who did not expect the extent of the damage as power and communications broke down and relief trickled slowly down to the people in the hinterlands. There will definitely be a change of perspective for all of us who never imagined the power of a typhoon such as this. [Click to watch recent scene from the aftermath]

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2013/11/20/daily-prompt-perspective-3/

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KIDS THREE 21 and ULTIMO ADIOS in FILIPINO SIGN LANGUAGE in ISTANBUL

November 5, 2013

Kids Three 21, a docu on Down Syndrome and Ultimo Adios / Last Farewell in FSL were shown to the Filipino community in Istanbul last Sunday, November 3. Philippine  Consul based in Ankara, Turkey  Leilani Feliciano opened the event with her opening remarks.

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Consul Leilani Feliciano delivered her opening remarks to the Filipino audience who attended the showing of Ultimo Adios and the premiere screening of KIDS THREE 21 in Istanbul, Turkey

With Don Bosco students

Group photo with Don Bosco students. [Front row]: Members of the organizing committee of the event including Rowena Ulayan, UKFF founder and Chairperson [4th L-R] and Consul Feliciano [4th R-L]. By the way, I [3rd L-R] – used to teach Art Education in Don Bosco, Makati City

Am now at the Philippine Embassy in Ankara, Turkey. Went to Ataturk Museum yesterday and the Ankara Castle.