Posts Tagged ‘Basic Production Workshop for the Deaf’

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Filipino Sign Language Declared National Sign Language of Deaf Filipinos

November 12, 2018

Our Deaf friend’s fight for the recognition of FSL has finally won! The long wait is over. The law declaring FSL as Deaf Filipinos’ national sign language has been signed by President Rodrigo Duterte. In looking back, I see myself since 2007 working to make films that give access to Deaf Filipinos having learnt the lack, if not, absence of captions and FSL interpretations in the materials they use. Incorporating and using FSL as my means to provide them the information that are of interest not just to hearing people but to them as well has become my personal advocacy ever since. Promoting FSL in my films and showing the talents of Deaf individuals has always been characteristics of my films. I also work with and for them. In fact, just last Friday, November 9, I handled a video production workshop for them at DLS-CSB School of Deaf Education and Applied Studies [SDEAS]. (Photo below)

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Workshop with Deaf Students of SDEAS where I studied Filipino SIgn Language in 2006-2007 held at PEN Lab

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Deaf students looking at the structural study / timeline of “Silent Odyssey,” my docu-feature on Deaf Filipinos and the origin of FSL made in 2008

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Looking forward, many great tasks ahead are in store for the Deaf sector who now has to work harder to monitor and make sure that the mandate to use FSL in all transactions involving Deaf is implemented. The law takes effect 15 days after its publication in the Official Gazette. Below is a report by Virgil Lopez of GMA News released just a few hours ago.

President Rodrigo Duterte has signed into law the measure declaring Filipino Sign Language (FSL) the national sign language of the Filipino Deaf and mandating the use of the same in all government transactions involving them.

Duterte approved Republic Act 11106 on October 30, a copy of which was released to the media on Monday.

The law mandates the use of the FSL in schools, hearings and transactions in courts and other tribunals, government workplaces and broadcast media.

Tasked to use and coordinate with each other on the use of FSL as the medium of instruction in deaf education are the Department of Education (DepEd), Commission on Higher Education (CHEd), Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA), and all other national and local government agencies involved in the education of the deaf.

The University of the Philippines (UP), Komisyon sa Wikang Filipino (KWF), professional sign linguistics, and linguistics researchers, CHEd and DepEd, and the Early Childhood Care Development (ECCD) Council, shall develop guidelines for the development of training materials in the education of the deaf for use by all state universities and colleges (SUCs), as well as their teachers and staff.

It also directs the KWF and SUCs led by UP to undertake continuing research for the development, propagation and preservation of FSL and its cultural history. Concerned government agencies, DepEd, CHEd and UP shall also take appropriate steps to make FSL as an elective subject in the curriculum, particularly of SUCs.

The law mandates KWF, in consultation with the deaf community and other stakeholders, to establish a national system of standards, accreditation and procedures for FSL interpretation.

“This shall include policies on the practice of interpreting as a profession such as compensation rates and benefits, working conditions, procedures for grievances and others,” it said.

The University of the Philippines (UP), Komisyon sa Wikang Filipino (KWF), professional sign linguistics, and linguistics researchers, CHEd and DepEd, and the Early Childhood Care Development (ECCD) Council, shall develop guidelines for the development of training materials in the education of the deaf for use by all state universities and colleges (SUCs), as well as their teachers and staff.

It also directs the KWF and SUCs led by UP to undertake continuing research for the development, propagation and preservation of FSL and its cultural history. Concerned government agencies, DepEd, CHEd and UP shall also take appropriate steps to make FSL as an elective subject in the curriculum, particularly of SUCs.

The law mandates KWF, in consultation with the deaf community and other stakeholders, to establish a national system of standards, accreditation and procedures for FSL interpretation.

“This shall include policies on the practice of interpreting as a profession such as compensation rates and benefits, working conditions, procedures for grievances and others,” it said.

The University of the Philippines (UP), Komisyon sa Wikang Filipino (KWF), professional sign linguistics, and linguistics researchers, CHEd and DepEd, and the Early Childhood Care Development (ECCD) Council, shall develop guidelines for the development of training materials in the education of the deaf for use by all state universities and colleges (SUCs), as well as their teachers and staff.

It also directs the KWF and SUCs led by UP to undertake continuing research for the development, propagation and preservation of FSL and its cultural history. Concerned government agencies, DepEd, CHEd and UP shall also take appropriate steps to make FSL as an elective subject in the curriculum, particularly of SUCs.

The law mandates KWF, in consultation with the deaf community and other stakeholders, to establish a national system of standards, accreditation and procedures for FSL interpretation.

“This shall include policies on the practice of interpreting as a profession such as compensation rates and benefits, working conditions, procedures for grievances and others,” it said.

The University of the Philippines (UP), Komisyon sa Wikang Filipino (KWF), professional sign linguistics, and linguistics researchers, CHEd and DepEd, and the Early Childhood Care Development (ECCD) Council, shall develop guidelines for the development of training materials in the education of the deaf for use by all state universities and colleges (SUCs), as well as their teachers and staff.

The University of the Philippines (UP), Komisyon sa Wikang Filipino (KWF), professional sign linguistics, and linguistics researchers, CHEd and DepEd, and the Early Childhood Care Development (ECCD) Council, shall develop guidelines for the development of training materials in the education of the deaf for use by all state universities and colleges (SUCs), as well as their teachers and staff.

It also directs the KWF and SUCs led by UP to undertake continuing research for the development, propagation and preservation of FSL and its cultural history. Concerned government agencies, DepEd, CHEd and UP shall also take appropriate steps to make FSL as an elective subject in the curriculum, particularly of SUCs.

The law mandates KWF, in consultation with the deaf community and other stakeholders, to establish a national system of standards, accreditation and procedures for FSL interpretation.

“This shall include policies on the practice of interpreting as a profession such as compensation rates and benefits, working conditions, procedures for grievances and others,” it said.

Within one year from the law’s effective date, the law states the broadcast media must already have FSL interpreter insets, compliant with accessibility standards for television, in news and public affairs programs.

It also orders government hospitals and health facilities to take steps to ensure access to the Filipino deaf to health services, including FSL interpreters and accessible materials upon request of deaf patients, or individuals who have family members who are deaf.

“As part of their corporate social responsibility, private health facilities are encouraged to provide access to health services to all deaf patients and their family members,” the law stated.

The law becomes effective 15 days after its publication in the Official Gazette or one newspaper of general circulation. — BM, GMA News