Posts Tagged ‘Apolinario Mabini’

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Film on APO MABINI Showing July 28 at the Open Air Auditorium, Rizal Park

July 27, 2019

From July 17-23, the annual celebration of the National Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation Week is held in the Philippines as a tribute to Apolinario Mabini, one of our national heroes. He was paralyzed at the height of his career as a lawyer. Despite that, he became the Chief Adviser of the first Philippine president Emilio Aguinaldo. Mabini was our first Prime Minister, and the first Minister of Foreign Affairs. As part of the post-celebration of the NDPR Week, the National Parks Development Committee shall screen the one-hour educational documentary at the Open-Air Auditorium in Rizal Park tomorrow, July 28, 2019 at 7:30 pm. Admission is FREE!

!pule poster_for Jul 28

Note that Apolinario Mabini was elected officer of the LIGA FILIPINA founded by Jose Rizal, another great hero after whom the place where it shall be shown, Rizal Park was named after. Rizal was executed at the then Bagumbayan, now called Rizal Park on December 30, 1896. Mabini born on July 23, 1864 died on May 13, 1903.

 

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PULE: Utak ng Rebolusyon sa Dasma, Cavite

July 21, 2018

The film screening of PULE: Utak ng Rebolusyon, a documentary on Apolinario Mabini was shown yesterday as part of the 40th Celebrations of the National Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation Week in Dasmarinas, Cavite. Venue was the Audio-Visual Room at the Pagamutan ng Dasmarinas located in Barangay Burol II. The program was initiated by Dasma DSWD in collaboration with Jan Pena, former National President of the Autism Society Philippines [ASP}. PULE was participated in by Deaf performers who interpreted Mabini’s El Verdadero Decalogo, and was music scored by a twice exceptional Person with Autism, Thristan Mendoza.

Two screenings were scheduled in the morning. from 8:00 to 12 noon. Viewers were CFDI Presidents, officers and members of ASP, SPED teachers and parents. Another viewing was held in the afternoon to accommodate more SPED teachers and parents. According to the text message of Jan Pena, the film was well-received by the stake holders probably because of their having learnt more about a man who is taken for granted as just one of those images of heroes in the Philippine coins nationally in circulation.

Below is the Calendar of Activities by DSWD Dasma up to July 31

Note: PULE will be shown again but in the province of Rizal on Monday, July 23, Apolinario Mabini’s birthday. Venue on Monday is SM Angono.

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In Preparation for the 2017 National Heroes Day

August 16, 2017

In August we celebrate the National Language Month, the History Month and the National Heroes Day.

We are all celebrating the three—in one film. I wasn’t thinking of showing it this month for all three reasons but for the last. However, when I come to think of it, in this educational documentary, I used Filipino, our National Language for the narration. And as the film promotes the use and recognition of the Filipino Sign Language as the National Sign Language of Deaf Filipinos, the timing is just perfect. They too have the right to celebrate the National Language Month afterall. Most fittingly, the subject is a historical figure and is considered one of our greatest heroes; paying him a tribute within the History Month, and as part of the celebration of the National Heroes Day [though days ahead because August 28 is a legal holiday] is seemingly pre-arranged.

Above is a grabbed frame from the one minute trailer that I have just finished now. The film is about Apolinario Mabini, the Brains of the Revolution. This is in preparation for the screening that we are going to hold on August 25 at the UP Film Center in UP Diliman, Q.C.

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PULE: Utak ng Rebolusyon in Celebration of the 2017 National Heroes Day

August 11, 2017

Apolinario Mabini was appointed as Chief Adviser of the First President of the Philippine Republic, Emilio Aguinaldo in 1898. He also became the First Secretary of Foreign Affairs [1899], and could have been the First Justice of the Supreme Court of the Philippines were not for the law at the turn of the century which stated that physically disabled persons could not be elected to the post. Despite that, he earned the monikers “Brains of the Revolution / Utak ng Rebolusyon” and “The Sublime Paralytic / Dakilang Lumpo.” He was most adamant against American sovereignty over the Philippines leading to his exile to Guam in 1901. My documentary PULE tells who he was, and what he actually did for the country. The film, intended for both hearing and Deaf hopes to inspire the audience by sparking patriotism in their hearts, and love of country above Self as exemplified by Mabini.

Mabini_Pule_for Posting2Gawad Metronian Educational Foundation, Inc. [GMEFI] is sponsoring its showing at the UP Film Center in UP Diliman on August 25, 2017 to help raise funds for the Scholarship Programs of GMEFI. It features the SILENT STEPS, DLS-CSB SDEAS’ All Deaf Performing Group and the first film scoring work of THRISTAN MENDOZA, a Person with Autism. The film is trilingual — narrated in Filipino, subtitled in English and interpreted in Filipino Sign Language.

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It’s PULE MABINI’s Birthday!

July 23, 2017

It is 11.30 pm. It is still Apolinario Mabini’s Birthday. I won’t say I am late in greeting him since the whole day today we have been talking about him, his presence with us as we worked overnight on Pule magazine at the office of Gawad Metronian Educational Foundation, Inc. Posting one of the flyers readied for him… in connection with our showing at the UP Film Center next month…

GMEFI_UP Pule

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“Apolinario Mabini: The Sublime Paralytic” – Reshowing at the Department of Foreign Affairs

July 18, 2017

“Apolinario Mabini: The Sublime Paralytic” will be shown again tomorrow, July 19 at 2 p.m. at the Department of Foreign Affairs Bldg. located in Pasay City as part of their annual celebration of the 2017 National Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation Week. It was first shown in 2015. DFA’s interest in Mabini of course lies in the fact that he was the first Secretary of Foreign Affairs of the First Philippine Republic. He was appointed in January 1899.

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Announcement Used by DFA the First Time “Apolinario Mabini: The Sublime Paralytic” was shown in 2015

According to the letter of request made by DFA’s Human Resource Management Office: “The film showing  is the Department’s fitting tribute to Mabini, the first Secretary of Foreign Affairs, whose heroism is worthy of emulation by the Filipino people notwithstanding his physical disability.” They describe the film as a “documentary that truly reflects cultural and political significance and underscores the noble heritage of the Filipino race.”

The Sublime Paralytic will be preceded by a 10-min AVP entitled “Inclusion.”

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“Signs of Change” Screens at the Philippine Embassy in Washington, D.C.

July 11, 2017

SIGNS of CHANGE is the last documentary that I made for Discovering Deaf Worlds and the Philippine Federation of the Deaf. It is scheduled to be shown next week July 20 in the U.S. [See the Philippine Embassy’s announcement below].

Meanwhile, on July 19, or  a day before that, my other docu about the First Secretary of Foreign Affairs Apolinario Mabini entitled “The Sublime Paralytic” will be shown at the Department of Foreign Affairs Bldg., in Pasay City, Metro-Manila. It is sponsored by DFA’s Human Resource Management Office. Both advocacy films are to be shown in celebration of the 2017 National Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation Week.

SIgns of Change

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Nominations for the 2017 Apolinario Mabini Awards has been extended to April 30

March 16, 2017

Nominations for the 2017 Apolinario Mabini Awards has been extended to April 30, 2017.  Categories for nomination are:  Presidential A. Mabini Award, Person With Disability (PWD) of the Year, PWD Group of the Year, Local Government Unit of the Year, Rehabilitation Volunteer/Group of the Year (Volunteer/Group Advocate for the Empowerment of PWDs of the Year), Employer of the Year, PWD Friendly Establishment (deadline March 31, 2017), PWD Media Advocate of the Year, and the Website Accessibility Award. Anyone can nominate individuals or groups to any category provided they meet the criteria.

The Mabini Awards, named after one of the country’s foremost hero,  Apolinario Mabini, recognizes individuals, groups and/or agencies that have made outstanding contributions to improve the welfare of Persons With Disability.   The award is inspired by Mabini’s creative genius that provided inspiration to the Philippine revolution.

The Award is spearheaded by the Philippine Foundation for the Rehabilitation of the Disabled  (PFRD), the oldest non-government organization in the Philippines  to address needs of Persons with Disability.

The awards will be presented in July 2017  in Malacanang Palace. The exact date will be announced later.

Please visit https://goo.gl/JGS5pB  for more information and to download forms.

You may also call Liza  at (632) 725-0093 or email  belardo_flordeliz@yahoo.com for more information.

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A Cultural Afternoon with Apolinario Mabini

March 16, 2017

Bulacan-w Even Ynal

The historic Barasoain Church in Malolos, Bulacan where the First Philippine National Assembly of the First Philippine Republic was held on September 15, 1898. [MM with Even / 2017]

It was on February 23, 2017 when the partnership presentation by the Provincial Government of Bulacan and Gawad Metronian Educational Foundation, Inc. [GMEFI] was held at the Maximo Viola Hall, Hiyas ng Bulacan Convention Center in Malolos, Bulacan. The Honorable Governor Wilhelmino Sy-Alvarado [photo below] graced the occasion. He welcomed the select audience consisting of educators, cultural officers, art and heritage advocates, and members of Bulacan provincial art and tourism board.

Bulacan-w Gov2
Honorable Governor of Bulacan Wilhelmino Sy-Alvarado delivers his Welcome Message to the Audience below

Audience“PULE: UTAK ng Rebolusyon” an educational documentary which features the life of Apolinario Mabini, Chief Adviser of the First President of the Philippine Republic was introduced before its screening by Mirana Medina, board member of GMEFI and the film’s director. She gave background information as to why and for whom the film was actually made giving stress on the film’s inclusivity as it has narration in Pilipino, with captions in English and largely interpreted in Filipino Sign Language. Participants in the making of the film are Deaf students, a Person with Autism and a wheel-chaired man.  Gil Reoma, GMEFI Executive Director later joined to talk about what GMEFI does and asked how the partnership between Bulacan counterpart could be made possible so as to make the film’s content widely known to Bulakenos. The Malolos Congress was highly given importance in the documentary. There were good exchange of ideas during the open forum [photo below] as viewers saw the importance of the film, and history for our young students.

W some of the participantsThe select Audience / participants with the organizers.

Bulacan-w GMEFI and OrganizersGMEFI staff: [L-R]: Gil Reoma on the extreme left, GMEFI President Even Dominguez, 3rd from left, Mrs. Natividad Villano and Mirana Medina, GMEFI Board Members with the co-organizers from the Governor’s Provincial History, Arts, Culture and Tourism Office  led by Mr. Ely dela Cruz, 4th from left.

A repost from gawadmetronian.org

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Historians, Researchers, Educators, Cultural Workers Previewed PULE: Utak ng Rebolusyon

March 7, 2017

On the second week of February, my educational documentary on our hero, Apolinario Mabini, PULE: Utak ng Rebolusyon / Brains of the Revolution, primarily made for the Deaf sector was previewed in two different venues —  at the main office of the National Historical Commission of the Philippines in Manila; the other at Maximo Viola Hall in the city of Malolos, Bulacan. Both cities are featured in the above docu, as they played very important roles in the history of the Philippines at the turn of the century. It covers the period from the time the American naval squadron entered the Philippines to engage in a War with the Spaniards in the Battle of Manila Bay [May 1, 1898], up to their finally taking over the sovereignty of our country [1899] in a manner detested and strongly objected by Mabini, subject of this documentary and Chief Adviser of the First Philippine President Emilio Aguinaldo. The Filipino Revolutionaries were actually already winning the War with Spain when the U.S. entered the Philippine soil. The two powers connived to hold a Mock Battle on August, 1898, followed by the signing of a treaty in Paris stating the handing over of the Philippines to the U.S. Our diplomat was not allowed to join, although by that time, the Filipino revolutionaries already declared independence from Spain on June 12, 1898. With a Constitution readied by a national assembly and approved by President Aguinaldo, the First Philippine Republic was inaugurated on January 23, 1899. Mabini’s defiance over the American sovereignty of the Philippines led to his being sent to Guam by the Americans as an exile.

Through the years, it became clear that the Americans posed in as friends at first, and then later turned into a foe having realized the strategic importance of the Philippines in the Far East. American soldier, William Grayson fired the first shot that started the Filipino-American War on February 4, 1899.

NHCP Preview2

It was on a Monday, February 7, that the O.I.C. Director of NHCP, Dr. Rene Escalante and the NHCP researchers viewed the film. I requested them to watch it before showing it to the general hearing public in August in commemoration of the National Heroes Day. I wanted feedback from “experts,” or those in the actual field.  I wanted to align, if ever there was misalignment with the facts that they are providing the people so that there would be no confusion in the minds of the viewing students. Fortunately, we had no data clashes. The researchers only particularly reacted to some of the photos that I got from the Mabini Shrine in Tanauan, Batangas like the picture of Mabini Standing, and the reproduction of artist Angel Cacnio’s painting entitled “The Capture of Mabini.” I was informed that the previous photo does not belong to NHCP but to a certain Mr. Kevin Cruz. Nonetheless, I emailed him as soon as I got his address from an NHCP personnel to inform him about my use of the picture, and sent him clips where and how the photo was used – not more than 30 seconds in totality. I have yet to write Mr. Cacnio. Moreover, one other researcher suggested if I could change the photo of Mabini shot allegedly in Guam. The issue he said is that it was not Mabini who was in the picture. However, I am keeping it since there is an existing photo with accompanying caption which says: The Guam Museum written above it [see below]. The better copy of the photo, or the one I used in the docu was reproduced from the NHCP Museum in Tanauan. As the issue has not yet been resolved whether it was really Mabini or not, I would still keep the picture. In fact, it was because of that reaction that I researched again for the copy of the photo that I got from filipinoamericanwar.com

Apolinario Mabini Guam newspaper2

This is the photo I am referring to. Notice on the top right side of the photo which states: The Guam Museum, and the words on the caption “….Mabini, along with 35 other Filipino patriots, WERE HERE [all caps mine – and that refers to Guam where Mabini was exiled] from 1901 to 1903.

One thing that struck me was their reaction to the insets of Filipino Sign Language [FSL] interpreters. Although the NHCP viewers were briefed before showing that the film was designed for the Deaf, and therefore would have FSL interpretations, they still wanted the traditional inset — small, in a box and kept in one corner. [I manipulated the image sizes and movement of the interpreter within the frame].

Though I found their reaction to it as quite surprising, I just rationalized as I was going home that perhaps for historians and researchers who are more interested and concentrated on the documents, data and message, the presence of sign language interpreters provided much distraction to their senses. And considering the language elements, and there are three: Filipino narration, English captions and FSL interpretation, that comes alongside the aural music and sound effects, and the visual elements simultaneously being presented, the need for mind processing is a bit more than the usual film with no textual and visual gestural elements involved. Discerning what language to give importance to also comes to the fore.

For hearing people unfamiliar with sign language, it is understandable that for them it meant nothing, and therefore, would pose only as solid distractions. In the end, they suggested if I could make another version with the traditional inset for FSL interpretation.  Of course, that would be by now impossible as the chroma background and the FSL interpreters are in composite form. Besides, it would defeat my own purpose and advocacy: that is, to give the Deaf Filipino sector access to information, and the other important objective of promoting the use and recognition of FSL in the Philippines which up to now has not been given attention to by the government. Most importantly, that was the very reason why DLS-CSB School of Deaf Education and Applied Studies partnered with me in the realization of the film — its primary target beneficiaries are Deaf people. In fact, before showing it for the first time to their students, a preview was also conducted, at that time, in the presence of Dean Nicky Templo, the FSL interpreters, some faculty staff — Deaf and hearing, and the Deaf participants themselves with the sole purpose of agreeing of disagreeing regarding the image sizes and presentation of FSL in the film.

The importance of FSL in giving Deaf access to information can be gleaned from the reaction to the film of Myra Medrana, Deaf choreographer of the Silent Steps. She said:

“I’m truly happy and grateful to Mirana for doing this film on Mabini in Filipino Sign Language. This is a wonderful project for the Filipino people, especially for us Deaf as we come to learn more about our history and our heroes. Looking back, I remember when I was little, my father would give me paper money to buy stuff and I see these faces of they say heroes whom I knew nothing about. Although they were taught in school, I only remember very little facts about them because they were not clearly explained in sign language. Much of the information back then were not that much accessible to the Deaf unlike today.

To be honest, history to me is blur. And it’s unclear not just to me… but to most Deaf especially the poor and the marginalized because of the very limited access to education and information. I only slowly began to understand it clearly when I got to work with Mirana, initially in the “A Mi Patria” project  [Rizal’s Poems in FSL], and now in Project Mabini. During the production, we went to Batangas and learned a lot about Mabini — that despite his disability he was able to contribute immensely in our country’s fight for freedom and independence. Somehow, this film has inspired us so much to be like Mabini.

Now, the Filipino Deaf community is fighting for FSL, our natural language to be recognized as official sign language in the country. This film is a great advocacy towards that goal and I appreciate Mirana’s effort in including Deaf artists and talents to show to people the beauty and richness of our OWN language..the Filipino Sign Language. I hope more films like this will be done for the benefit of the Deaf community so that they too will learn about our history.”

NHCP Preview

O.I.C. Director of NHCP and DLSU History Professor, Dr. Rene Escalante [seated] with the NHCP researchers and other staff; MM in blue

Anyway, that stress be given according to Dr. Escalante regarding the importance of the Separation of Church and State issue, I greatly considered and appreciated. But as to the non-linear timeline of events, I am still keeping the sequence that I currently have. Lest I forget, the woman seated beside me said she liked the treatment, the creative interpretation.

My thanks to Dr. Escalante and his staff for sharing their time to watch, react and give their comments re the docu. A particular sector’s reaction does differ. Shown two days later to another group consisting of educators, heritage advocates, a local historian, tourism and cultural workers, including a staff from NHCP-Malolos in Bulacan reacted also positively but with better appreciation of the FSL use. [This I shall take up in my next blogpost].