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Deaf people are “People of the eye, first, last and all the time”

October 2, 2010

George W. Veditz who called deaf people “People of the eye, first, last and all the time” realized that the medium of film was the perfect vehicle for preserving sign language. He reasoned that signs could not accurately be portrayed three dimensionally through drawings, no matter how detailed, whereas film would show the exact movement, context, beauty and meaning.

In an effort to make sure sign language in its purest form would be preserved for posterity, Veditz and his colleagues spearheaded a campaign to raise $5,000.00 to fund the National Association of the Deaf Motion Picture Project that would film eminent deaf and hearing speakers using sign language between 1910-1920.

Read about George W. Veditz and the National Association of the Deaf Motion Picture Project by clicking the URL of the original source below:

Veditz.html+world+deaf+cinema&cd=2&hl=tl&ct=clnk&gl=ph&client=firefox-a

Trivia notes:

The earliest known Deaf film is entitled Deaf mute girl reciting “Star spangled banner” produced by American Mutoscope and Biograph company in 1902 but the oldest known generally available film showing sign language is the 1910 film of Edward Miner Gallaudet telling, in sign language, about The Lorna Doone country of Devonshire, England and produced by the National Association of the Deaf.  (To read the full article, click Gallaudet University’s site  Oldest_Deaf_Films.html+Deaf+films&cd=14&hl=tl&ct=clnk&gl=ph&client=firefox-a)

To watch early photos of Gallaudet U and to see how Edward Gallaudet looked like, click below:

2 comments

  1. how are you!This was a really excellent Topics!
    I come from uk, I was luck to find your Topics in digg
    Also I get much in your blog really thank your very much i will come daily


  2. I am a hearing person but I found the topic quite interesting as well. Thanks for the visit!



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